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The Episcopal Church – Where you can love God, and you don’t have to hate anyone.

We are located at 1802 Abercorn Street  Savannah, Georgia 31401, on the south-east corner of 34th & Abercorn Streets. Parish Office hours are kept Monday through Thursday, 9am-3pm. You may call us at 912.232.0274.

On Sundays, Mass is said at 8 a.m. and sung at 10 a.m., it is in Spanish at 12:15 p.m. and it is contemplative at 6:30 p.m. We offer a host of other worship opportunities, just click on the Weekly Mass Schedule link to learn more.

Caroling Party: Friday December 19th from 6pm to 8pm. The Trolley will leave promptly at 6:30pm from the Church

Help make Christmas Decorations for the Church: Saturday, December 20th at 9am. A good pair of clippers and a desire to make our House of Worship ready for the celebration of our Our Lord’s Nativity is all you need to be part of this yearly event.

St. Paul’s is a parish serving Savannah and the Episcopal Diocese of Georgia in the fullness of the Catholic and Reformed faith of the Anglican Communion since 1852. As a Collegiate Church we are a Parish that maintains a cooperative model of ministry which employs the many capabilities of the Baptized in the pursuit of God’s Mission. In particular we are home to a community of priests and religious that maintains the classic round of worship commended by the Book of Common Prayer. This includes the public recitation of the daily offices of Morning and Evening Prayer and the complete round of Eucharistic celebrations, recommended by the Prayer Book Calendar and Lesser Feasts and Fasts. Furthermore, we provide extra opportunities for the celebration of the Eucharist in the observance of Feast Days of our Lord.

Besides the College of Priests that serve our Altars and call St. Paul’s home, six members of the Parish belong to three religious communities; including the Oratory of the Good Shepherd and two Benedictine Fellowships: the Community of St. Joseph and the Society of St. Aelred of Rievaulx.

Established as the first Free Pew Parish in Savannah, St. Paul’s has attempted for 162 years to live into the sacramental and evangelistic implications of the recovery and continuing formation of Catholic tradition in the Episcopal Church.

We are Children of God committed to deepening our discipleship, adopting the Episcopal Church as the spiritual home where we live into the challenges of the Christian faith. We see the diversity of our religious histories, interests and cultures as one of our strengths as a parish family. Primarily we are here because we find Jesus Christ in our worship, in our fellowship and in our ministry and service to others.

The Power of Polite, Persistent Invitation to Worship

Christmas will be upon us sooner than I care to imagine. With it, as with Easter, comes one of our two best opportunities to invite friends, family and co-workers to join you for worship. Survey after survey shows that most southerners who do not have a church home will react favorably to an invitation to church at these times of year. Even in this post-Christendom age many are culturally conditioned toward Christmas and Easter worship.

This is a great time of year to make sure that you have flyers about your Christmas liturgies and any other special events, such as Lessons and Carols. Encourage everyone in your congregation to give them to friends, family and co-workers with an invitation to join your church family for Christmas. The one caveat is this: even if the person reacts favorably, and even says they will come, they might well not darken the church doors this Feast of the Nativity. Most of us then decide that the seed has been scattered on soil not yet disposed toward growth and then never make another invitation. This is where we can easily fail in scattering seed.

It may well take a Christmas invitation, followed by an Easter invitation, followed by yet another Christmas invitation before your friends actually show up for church. Never underestimate the inertia that must be overcome to make the move from not attending church to worshipping faithfully. Keep the invitations persistent and low key, always making sure folks know they are welcome, without ever making someone feel bad for not showing up. That is how such seeds are consistently scattered.

Please do not hear me as saying that a church invitation equals evangelism. But the Word and Sacrament encountered once the newcomers show up contains powerful Gospel content, expecially at Christmas with its incarnational emphasis and Easter with the hope of the resurrection. And clergy know that these occasions bring newcomers and will be working hard on their homilies to give real meat on which a non-churchgoer can chew (Right? We are doing that aren’t we?). Evangelism is not just a matter of getting folks through the doors for the liturgy, but certainly that is a key part and one in which any Episcopalian can help with a no pressure invitation, “Why don’t you join us for Christmas Eve? They candlight service is always breathtaking.” How hard could that be? It’s easier than you might think.

What will come of these invitations? As Eliot writes in The Four Quartets, “For us, there is only the trying. The rest is not our business.” A gentle invitation from time to time is the trying. Keeping that friendly, low pressure, no guilt is easy for us Episcopalians. How folks respond is not our business. That is God’s concern.

-The Rev. Canon Frank Logue, Canon to the Ordinary

PS: It is a great time to use the Diocese of Georgia’s Hospitality Checklist found in our online Reference Library http://gaepiscopal.org/docs/hospitalitychecklist.pdf